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Rabat

The name of the town Rabat originates from an Arabic word, meaning suburb, as it was used to be a suburb of Mdina. Half of the present village was used to make part of the Roman City of Melita until it was resized by the Arabs around 870 A.D. Many say that Rabat is the birthplace of Maltese Christianity since according to the tradition, Apostle Saint Paul took refuge for three months in the heart of the village in a cave after being shipwrecked on the island, around 60 A.D.

 

Rabat possesses a lot of heritage. In this traditional village and its limits one can find around 23 Churches and Chapels which include the Parish Church dedicated to Saint Paul which under it one can find the St. Paul’s Grotto. Rabat started out as an agricultural town although it still holds its agricultural feel it turned into a modern place where one can find a number of restaurants and bars while you visit its heritage.

 

Sightseeing Sights

 

St Paul’s Church and St Paul’s Grotto

The church was constructed in the 16th century, over the grotto where it is believed that St Paul lived and prayed during his stay in Malta.

 

Domus Romana (Roman Villa)

Featuring many Roman remains of ceramics, glass objects, tombstones and busts, the Villa’s main attraction is the well-preserved mosaic floor. It is located on the road near the entrance to Mdina.

 

St. Paul’s and St. Agatha’s Catacombs  

The site constitutes of St.Paul’s and St. Agatha’s Catacombs which are a typical complex of interconnected, underground Roman cemeteries that were in use up to the 4th century AD. Another interesting feature in the Maltese Catacombs is the Agape Table, probably used as a table for the final farewell repast. 

 

Wignacourt Museum

This is situated adjacent to Rabat's Parish Church of St Paul. The original building was commissioned as a baroque residence of the Chaplains of the Knights of Malta by Grand Master Aloph de Wignacourt in the early 17th century, completed on three levels in 1749, opened as a museum in 1981 and extensively refurbished and reopened bringing it back to its former glory in 2012.

 

Palazzo Xara

Palazzo Xara is an authentic building in the heart or Rabat. The Maltese noble Family Xara constructed this imposing building in the beginning of the 18th Century, when Baroque architecture was at its peak. Today this building is used as local band club where one can even dine as well.

 

Casa Bernard

Casa Bernard is a 16th century palazzo located in the heart of Rabat. It is the private home of a Maltese Noble family that has been renovated to its former grandeur, combining beautiful architectural features, such as the balcony, an authentic 16th century front door, a barrel-vaulted hallway and a cellar that contains a chapel. There is an impressive piano and a striking spiral staircase that take you to a three storey watch tower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wignacourt Museum
Domus Romana
Catacombs
Saint Paul's Grotto
St Paul’s Church and St Paul’s Grotto
Anchor 1

The name of the town Rabat originates from an Arabic word, meaning suburb, as it was used to be a suburb of Mdina. Half of the present village was used to make part of the Roman City of Melita until it was resized by the Arabs around 870 A.D. Many say that Rabat is the birthplace of Maltese Christianity since according to the tradition, Apostle Saint Paul took refuge for three months in the heart of the village in a cave after being shipwrecked on the island, around 60 A.D.

 

Rabat possesses a lot of heritage. In this traditional village and its limits one can find around 23 Churches and Chapels which include the Parish Church dedicated to Saint Paul which under it one can find the St. Paul’s Grotto. Rabat started out as an agricultural town although it still holds its agricultural feel it turned into a modern place where one can find a number of restaurants and bars while you visit its heritage.

 

Sightseeing Sights

 

St Paul’s Church and St Paul’s Grotto

The church was constructed in the 16th century, over the grotto where it is believed that St Paul lived and prayed during his stay in Malta.

 

Domus Romana (Roman Villa)

Featuring many Roman remains of ceramics, glass objects, tombstones and busts, the Villa’s main attraction is the well-preserved mosaic floor. It is located on the road near the entrance to Mdina.

 

St. Paul’s and St. Agatha’s Catacombs  

The site constitutes of St.Paul’s and St. Agatha’s Catacombs which are a typical complex of interconnected, underground Roman cemeteries that were in use up to the 4th century AD. Another interesting feature in the Maltese Catacombs is the Agape Table, probably used as a table for the final farewell repast. 

 

Wignacourt Museum

This is situated adjacent to Rabat's Parish Church of St Paul. The original building was commissioned as a baroque residence of the Chaplains of the Knights of Malta by Grand Master Aloph de Wignacourt in the early 17th century, completed on three levels in 1749, opened as a museum in 1981 and extensively refurbished and reopened bringing it back to its former glory in 2012.

 

Palazzo Xara

Palazzo Xara is an authentic building in the heart or Rabat. The Maltese noble Family Xara constructed this imposing building in the beginning of the 18th Century, when Baroque architecture was at its peak. Today this building is used as local band club where one can even dine as well.

 

Casa Bernard

Casa Bernard is a 16th century palazzo located in the heart of Rabat. It is the private home of a Maltese Noble family that has been renovated to its former grandeur, combining beautiful architectural features, such as the balcony, an authentic 16th century front door, a barrel-vaulted hallway and a cellar that contains a chapel. There is an impressive piano and a striking spiral staircase that take you to a three storey watch tower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wignacourt Museum
Domus Romana
Catacombs
Saint Paul's Grotto
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